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Mark Manders
Room with Chairs and Factory (2003-2008)
240 x 405 x 318 (h) cm  wood, iron, rubber, painted polyester, painted ceramic, paintede canvas, canvas, painted wig, chair, offset print on paper.
I saw the Mark Manders’s exhibitionParallel Occurrences / Documented Assignmentsat the Dallas Museum of Art yesterday and it’s absolutely amazing. Manders uses his sculptures and drawings to create what art has been meaning to do for the past hundred of years: experiencing magic first hand. He fools his viewers into believing of living in a contemporary world and living in the past at the same time. He also fools the viewers through his materials: he creates realistic humans to look like fresh clay, when the materials are actually made of bronze and painted to look like clay. He even makes blocks of broken up clay surrounding his completed sculptures, just to push his trickery even farther.
Another great part about this exhibition was all the descriptions of the pieces were written by Manders himself. As successful as Manders is with his physical work, he’s just as smart with his words. He has a hilarious sense of humor for the art world that adds the extra sweetness to his works. Here’s his description of the piece pictured above:
"As an artist you are not only talking to your­ self. In making artworks, you are also talking to works by other artists. Good artworks freeze, and they all freeze around one single moment. There this work speaks to the silent paintings of de Chirico. I wanted to make de Chirico jealous with this room. I know that he has been dead now for more than thirty years, but for us that does not matter, and I don’t mean jealous in a negative way but jealous in a more beautiful way, and in this good way I succeeded. This work is an image of the word factory that is taken from outside and placed inside a room. The organization of the interior of this living room factory is based on the very first floor plan of Self-Portrait as a Building from 1986.You can file both works under Bachelor Machines."
I’m completely amazed and in love with Manders and I strongly encourage you to click on his name in the beginning of this post and look through his work. The pictures are still wonderful, but it doesn’t do it justice as it does seeing these works first hand. I strongly recommend seeing his work in person if you ever get the chance. 

Mark Manders

Room with Chairs and Factory (2003-2008)

240 x 405 x 318 (h) cm
wood, iron, rubber, painted polyester, painted ceramic, paintede canvas, canvas, painted wig, chair, offset print on paper.

I saw the Mark Manders’s exhibitionParallel Occurrences / Documented Assignmentsat the Dallas Museum of Art yesterday and it’s absolutely amazing. Manders uses his sculptures and drawings to create what art has been meaning to do for the past hundred of years: experiencing magic first hand. He fools his viewers into believing of living in a contemporary world and living in the past at the same time. He also fools the viewers through his materials: he creates realistic humans to look like fresh clay, when the materials are actually made of bronze and painted to look like clay. He even makes blocks of broken up clay surrounding his completed sculptures, just to push his trickery even farther.

Another great part about this exhibition was all the descriptions of the pieces were written by Manders himself. As successful as Manders is with his physical work, he’s just as smart with his words. He has a hilarious sense of humor for the art world that adds the extra sweetness to his works. Here’s his description of the piece pictured above:

"As an artist you are not only talking to your­ self. In making artworks, you are also talking to works by other artists. Good artworks freeze, and they all freeze around one single moment. There this work speaks to the silent paintings of de Chirico. I wanted to make de Chirico jealous with this room. I know that he has been dead now for more than thirty years, but for us that does not matter, and I don’t mean jealous in a negative way but jealous in a more beautiful way, and in this good way I succeeded. This work is an image of the word factory that is taken from outside and placed inside a room. The organization of the interior of this living room factory is based on the very first floor plan of Self-Portrait as a Building from 1986.You can file both works under Bachelor Machines."

I’m completely amazed and in love with Manders and I strongly encourage you to click on his name in the beginning of this post and look through his work. The pictures are still wonderful, but it doesn’t do it justice as it does seeing these works first hand. I strongly recommend seeing his work in person if you ever get the chance. 

4 notes

  1. coopsypoopsy posted this